Garden?

by morag cook on September 29th, 2012

“Gardens, scholars say, are the first sign of commitment to a community. When people plant corn they are saying, let's stay here. And by their connection to the land, they are connected to one another.”

Anne Raver quotes

 


What is Guerrilla Gardening?
Guerrilla gardening is 'political gardening' primarily  practiced by activists and environmentalists who address issues related to land rights and permaculture.
Activists squatt land for cultivating plants and crops for the enjoyment of the community.
Some Guerrilla gardening actitivities take place under the cover of darkness and some openly infront of the community as a way of highlighting the 'Guerrilla gardening movement' but also encouraging them to engage in the activity with the hope of  harvesting  a sense of  'pride' in your community and environment. 

Some communities have even recieved permission by land owners to create gardens on developement land that is yet to be constructed, these have become active open gardens which are enjoyed by the community for local events and awareness days, fitness classes, picnics, parties and get togethers, all maintained by a community group who work together planting, watering and weeding to create a fantastic space. (see Lewes Road Community Carden Brighton) 


There are opposing veiws on Guerrilla gardening, some people think it is vandalism, others think it's wonderful and what harm can sharing plants do?

 

 

What is Guerrilla Gardening?
Guerrilla gardening is 'political gardening' primarily  practiced by activists and environmentalists who address issues related to land rights and permaculture.
Activists squatt land for cultivating plants and crops for the enjoyment of the community.
Some Guerrilla gardening actitivities take place under the cover of darkness and some openly infront of the community as a way of highlighting the 'Guerrilla gardening movement' but also encouraging them to engage in the activity with the hope of  harvesting  a sense of  'pride' in your community and environment. 

Some communities have even recieved permission by land owners to create gardens on developement land that is yet to be constructed, these have become active open gardens which are enjoyed by the community for local events and awareness days, fitness classes, picnics, parties and get togethers, all maintained by a community group who work together planting, watering and weeding to create a fantastic space. (see Lewes Road Community Carden Brighton) 


There are opposing veiws on Guerrilla gardening, some people think it is vandalism, others think it's wonderful and what harm can sharing plants do?



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